A Better Nights Sleep: Useful Tip

A while back, I mentioned the benefits of a seizure diary to help monitor seizure activity and potential triggers in our day-to-day life. 

 

But I also have a second book… 

 

For me, sleep is really important, if I lose too much I know there will be trouble. I can’t afford to go to bed feeling tense with my head swimming with the stresses of the day and sometimes there are issues you can’t always talk about with others.

So a few years ago I began to offload my bad days to a notepad before I went to sleep. 

It worked wonders, and as the period of bad stress reduced in my life, I used it less and less.

Yes, there are times I have had to pick it up again, but that’s life, everyone has stress from time to time. 

I never realised how I depended on it, until recently, when I was thrown into a horrific week and I discovered myself searching for it before I went to sleep. 

It’s my lifeline for when things are tough, and my saviour for a better night’s sleep, you scribble it all down and you feel as though a weight has been lifted. 

I would recommend it to anyone – especially someone with epilepsy who needs their sleep like me!

(Tip – keep the book in a secret place, so you can pour your heart out. I’ve done such a good job of hiding mine I’ve yet to find it! )

 

Thanks for reading!

Becky 🙂

Keeping Relaxed

Many people who have epilepsy find that the stresses of day-to-day life can aggravate their condition.

During one of my most stressful times – university where I was also battling a crazy family life, people were suggesting for me to take up yoga, but I couldn’t find the time, spare money or a lift to the classes.

Naturally, I find doing the things that make you happy to be an excellent way of reducing stress.

But even then, I have had trouble sleeping.

One effective way of relaxing I find is through meditation, I listen to recordings on YouTube before I go to sleep, as this is the time my mind is really overactive.  I find these recordings to be incredibly effective at removing that constant chatter, helping me sleep.

I know that not many people have tried meditation at they think it’s a bit ‘out there’, but it really does relax you and clear your mind, I would recommend it to anybody.

For example, I was listening to one the other night and woke up about 4am wondering why I was uncomfortable – I had fallen asleep during the recording and still had my giant headphones on!

I’ve also listened to meditations the night before tests as they help promote positivity and self believe, which is perfect for me, and you do wake up with a much more confident attitude.

Here is a sample video from Youtube 

Tips:

  • The majority of relaxing music is just that, with ocean waves and gentle music. It will just remove the over thinking in your mind and allow you to relax.
  • There are some videos which use things such as white noise and… alpha waves? Some descriptions have an epilepsy warning in them so I would steer clear of them. You can always consult a healthcare professional you want to listen to them.
  • Some tracks are really relaxing others are annoying, and a little cheesy, but it’s about finding something you like. I have had similar results with classical music but I do find that sometimes I end up listening to the music!
  • Last tip, if you have an iPhone and you want to save your battery, once the video starts playing, press the off button on your phone once so the screen goes black. The video will stop playing, but when you press the home key, on the screen you will notice you can press play without seeing the video, just tap the phone screen off again and it will continue playing for you!

I hope you’ll give it a try to see it helps you stay relaxed.

Becky 🙂